Lawyer course

Sandy Hook’s attorney intends to turn over a copy of Alex Jones’ phone to the Jan. 6 panel

HInvestigators from the January 6 committee may soon get their hands on a copy of Infowars host Alex Jones’ cellphone with communications dating back two years.

Attorney Mark Bankston, who represents the parents of victims of the Sandy Hook school shooting, said in court Thursday that the January 6 committee had requested the digital file of Jones’ phone and this he intends to comply unless he is ordered not to.

JAN. 6 COMMITTEE TO SUBPOENA ALEX JONES FOR RECORDS ACCIDENTALLY GIVEN TO SANDY HOOK TEAM: REPORT

A day earlier, Bankston revealed that Jones’ legal team had accidentally given him a copy of Jones’ phone, after which it was reported that the January 6 panel was considering a subpoena. Jones’ attorneys had taken no steps to identify the case as “privileged or protected in any way,” according to Bankston.

“You ordered my attorney to breach solicitor-client privilege and tell him about our private conversations, which is just unprecedented. I mean, it’s like a tour de force on how to breach the rights of people,” Jones said in a phone call after a contentious day in court on Wednesday.

Parents who lost children in the 2012 Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting that killed 26 people are suing Jones for defamation. They are seeking $150 million in damages and have accused Jones of peddling conspiracy theories that the shooting was a hoax. Jones conceded the Sandy Hook shooting was “100% real” when he appeared on Wednesday.

Judge Maya Guerra Gamble, who is overseeing the case, denied Jones’ request for a mistrial on Thursday, chastising that her legal team made several requests to have the trial dismissed which she denied.

Bankston hinted Wednesday that Jones may have committed perjury when Jones suggested upon discovery that he had looked at his phone and found no relevant communications referencing Sandy Hook. Jones appeared to dismiss this, noting that his lawyers had given Bankston a copy of his phone.
Throughout the trial, the judge repeatedly reminded Jones that he was under oath. Clips of Jones appearing to make false statements during the trial swirled on social media.

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The Jan. 6 committee subpoenaed Jones to appear last November, and he spoke with the panel but invoked his Fifth Amendment right several times, NBC News reported. The committee expressed interest in how some of the rallies leading up to the Capitol Riot were organized. Jones participated in a few of these events and interviewed Oath Keepers leader Stewart Rhodes, who faces seditious conspiracy charges related to the Capitol Riot.

The Washington Examiner contacted a representative of the January 6 committee expressing interest in the copy of Jones’ phone, but did not receive a response.