Lawyer salary

Forensic investigator ordered to pay ex-lawyer $438,000 over defamatory comments about Corryn Rayney murder

“More important than this case is that more than 15 years later, and after wasting $20 million persecuting an innocent person, there is still no justice for Corryn, for Caitlyn and for Sarah,” he said. he declared.

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Rayney said he believed it was “not difficult to find the real answer” in the murder investigation, but was unsure if police were actively investigating.

Reynolds refused to apologize to Rayney and said he would appeal the decision.

“It’s a losing battle, but it’s a war and there are still steps ahead,” he said.

Corryn Rayney was killed in 2007.

In her judgment, Judge Jennifer Hill found that Reynolds’ comments at the seminar carried the defamatory accusation that Rayney had murdered his wife.

“Dr. Reynolds’ defense that his comments were ‘true in fact’ cannot be sustained,” she said.

“As to an award of damages, I am of the view that Mr. Rayney is entitled to damages to compensate him for the personal injury and distress caused by Dr. Reynolds’ statements and to defend his reputation.”

Rayney was awarded $350,000 in damages, which rose to $438,000 with interest.

His lawyer, Martin Bennett, declined to say whether Reynolds would also be ordered to pay his legal bill.

Corryn Rayney was killed in 2007 after she was last seen alive in a Bentley bootscooting class. His body was found a week later buried in a shallow bush grave in Kings Park.

WA Police infamously named her husband as the ‘prime and only suspect’ at a press conference shortly after his death.

Forensic officer Mark Reynolds (far right) was one of the investigators who arrived on the first day of Lloyd Rayney's murder trial with matching bespoke ties.  A member of the investigative team referred to these ties as part of a “tribal” culture within the police.

Forensic officer Mark Reynolds (far right) was one of the investigators who arrived on the first day of Lloyd Rayney’s murder trial with matching bespoke ties. A member of the investigative team referred to these ties as part of a “tribal” culture within the police.

The comments led Rayney to successfully sue the state government for libel in 2017 and be awarded $2.62 million in damages and compensation for the substantial loss of salary and reputation he suffered.

Rayney, once a top prosecutor, no longer practices law after being struck off the Western Australia docket in 2020 for his ‘proneness to lying’.

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